Pedro Arantes
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Dunning-Kruger Effect

Is a cognitive bias hypothesis in which people with low ability at a given task overestimate their ability at that task.
#david-dunning
Zettelkasten, January 30, 2021
## Notes - It was identified by psychologists [David Dunning](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Dunning) and [Justin Kruger](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Justin_Kruger) in a 1999 study. - This identification derived from the criminal [case of McArthur Wheeler](https://steemit.com/steemstem/@rsc227/the-curious-case-of-mcarthur-wheeler), who robbed two banks while his face was covered with lemon juice because he thought that the juice would make it invisible. - Is a [cognitive bias](/zettel/cognitive-bias) hypothesis in which people with low ability at a given task overestimate their ability at that task. - Comes from people's inability to recognize their lack of ability and poor self-awareness. - Comes from people's ignorance of a given activity's standards of performance. - If you don't have the competency, you can't know you don't have competency in a task. The skills you need to produce the right response about your competency are the same skills you need to know what a right response is. - Deficits in skill and expertise create a two-prolonged problem. 1. People perform poorly in the domain in which they're incompetent. 2. The incompetence makes them unable to recognize their mistakes. ## References - [Dunning-Kruger Effect 101](https://twitter.com/SahilBloom/status/1350077522935832576) - [Dunning–Kruger effect](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunning%E2%80%93Kruger_effect) - [The Dunning-Kruger Effect](https://www.verywellmind.com/an-overview-of-the-dunning-kruger-effect-4160740)
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